Wednesday, June 06, 2007

6 June 1944

Sixty three years ago today, the United States and its allies -- Britain, Canada, France & Poland -- stormed the beaches, and glided via parachute and glider into the fields of Normandy. This daring move started the final climactic thrust into continental Europe that would, elven months later in May 1945, end the war and the Third Reich.

The courage of those troops, and the daring of their commanders to attempt such a landing are unparalleled. I can only imagine the terror of waiting for the ramp to drop on a landing craft or the green light telling you to jump into the night, over hostile territory. I can only admire the professionalism and courage that it took then to fight and accomplish the mission. Thankfully, we were on the winning side of that conflict and thankfully we had leaders who felt it necessary to win, and permitted the armed forces the latitude they needed to do so.

Take a moment today, and recall the courage, sacrifice and honor of the men who invaded Normandy, all those years ago. They are growing older, and someday there will be no veterans of World War II left among us. It is our duty to remember them and what they did on 6 June 1944, now and always.

2 comments:

Matt said...

Amen.

What a horrifying contrast these men are to the beneficiaries of this heroic effort. I'm just glad that my grandfather—a veteran—isn't alive to witness such rampant selfishness in the form of Paris Hilton, My Super Sweet Sixteen, or the able-bodied young man who sat on the T this morning while an elderly woman stood at his feet.

It's appalling.

Agricola said...

Matt:

Thanks for your comment, and for reading.

Our world is definitely different than the world of 6 June 1944. Rudeness and selfishness are so damn ugly and our culture is filled with them, and getting ever uglier.

As a parent I worry about this ugliness and work hard to teach my kids to be courteous, kind and generous. This education starts early and needs to in order to counter the prevalence of the self esteem, entitlement crowd.

I'm thankful for your grandfather's service.